Why Britain should vote 'Leave'Australia should hope for a Brexit. IPA Adjunct Fellow Georgina Downer explains why Britain should vote to leave the European Union, and what a successful Leave vote will mean for Australia. Read Georgina's full report: http://www.ipa.org.au/publications/2519/in-defence-of-the-british-nation-state:-the-australian-case-for-brexit Posted by Institute of Public Affairs on Tuesday, 21 June 2016
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Why Brexit matters for Australia

Britain’s European Union ‘Stay’ or ‘Leave’ referendum is just a few days away.

Although at first sight this may appear to be irrelevant to Australia, a foreign government potentially exiting their supranational union, there are a variety of implications for our foreign policy and public policy issues.

The IPA’s Georgina Downer has a new paper out today exploring the Australian case for Britain leaving the European Union:

Brexit would have tangible benefits for Australian international relations. Beginning with a free trade deal with Australia which Britain currently can’t negotiate independently of the EU, the benefits would be considerable for Australian and British exporters alike.

Downer argues that the British never had a choice to enter the European Union, the EU is anti-democratic, and that Australia could benefit from Brexit:

 

Why Britain should vote ‘Leave’Australia should hope for a Brexit.

IPA Adjunct Fellow Georgina Downer explains why Britain should vote to leave the European Union, and what a successful Leave vote will mean for Australia.

Read Georgina’s full report: http://www.ipa.org.au/publications/2519/in-defence-of-the-british-nation-state:-the-australian-case-for-brexit

Posted by Institute of Public Affairs on Tuesday, 21 June 2016

 

As the IPA’s Chris Berg explored last week, Brexit is a contest “between red tape and administrative power on the one side, and democracy and sovereignty on the other”.

In fact, the EU has a serious democratic deficit:

It’s one thing to create a government, it’s another to create a responsible, legitimate government. Even the EU acknowledges that it suffers from a perceived democratic deficit – that the citizens of Europe do not feel they are able to reject the administrations and policies that rule them.

Berg concludes that:

The European Union represents the worst inclinations of modern government – heavily bureaucratic, deliberately undemocratic, meddling and interventionist. Australian policymakers should not imagine that British discontent with Brussels has no lessons for them.

Update: On Thursday, 24 June 2016 the United Kingdom voted to ‘Leave’ the European Union.

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